Saturday, April 21, 2018

"Algorithms promise: If you like this, you will get more of it, forever."

Style Is an Algorithm

No one is original anymore, not even you.

"The bottom line for obesity is that we are eating too much of everything, not only sugar."

A sugar tax alone will not reduce obesity


"Related to sugar and calories, an interesting “natural experiment” occurred in Cuba during the 1990s. After the Soviet Union’s collapse, Cubans’ life turned difficult and in the diet the proportion of energy from sugar cane increased. 

Still, obesity, diabetes, and heart disease decreased, because total calories were reduced. The bottom line for obesity is that we are eating too much of everything, not only sugar. Pizzas, fries and salty pastries do not include much sugar, still they can make one obese and their saturated fat increases risk for vascular disease. A sugar tax may be a good start in the prevention of obesity, but on the other hand may give a misguiding signal that shunning sugar corrects everything. Maybe a calorie tax on food items would be a better idea."

1,500 invited to attend funeral of former First Lady Barbara Bush

1,500 invited to attend funeral of former First Lady Barbara Bush

The list of family, dignitaries and invited guests attending funeral of former First Lady Barbara Bush Saturday is long and distinguished.



Thursday, April 19, 2018

Blank & Jones - Glow



Blank & Jones - Glow (Official Video)

Obesity linked with higher chance of developing rapid, irregular heart rate

Obesity linked with higher chance of developing rapid, irregular heart rate



“When the heart is strained, it can lead to changes in the atrium — the top chambers of the heart — and it’s here where we believe structural abnormalities can precipitate atrial fibrillation,” Foy said. “Patients with obesity tend to have more fibrosis, higher pressures and more fatty infiltration in the top chamber of their hearts, so atrial fibrillation could be related to these types of changes.”

Celebrating Richard Epstein: "It was the greatest compliment—that he was willing to teach and engage us with his incredible mind."

Celebrating Richard Epstein

Colleagues Honor a Prolific Scholar with a Festschrift Conference and a Collection of Tribute Essays

Tuesday, April 17, 2018

"...the concept of healthy obesity is crude and problematic and may best be laid to rest..."

Is There Such a Thing as ‘Healthy Obesity’?

A new research paper states that the term should be retired. Other experts say the assumption obese people are unhealthy causes a variety of problems.
Johnson explains that the term “healthy obesity” is flawed since people who are obese, even those who are “metabolically” healthy, are still at increased risk for a host of health conditions, including type 2 diabetes, chronic kidney disease, and overall increased risk of mortality.
“While the concept of healthy obesity is crude and problematic and may best be laid to rest, there is great opportunity for human biological investigation of the levels, causes, and consequences of heterogeneity in health among people with the same BMI,” Johnson said, pointing out people with the same BMI can have different health risks.

At, with, and beyond risk: expectations of living with the possibility of future dementia

 2018 Apr 16. doi: 10.1111/1467-9566.12731. [Epub ahead of print]

At, with[,] and beyond risk: expectations of living with the possibility of future dementia.

Author information

1
Institute of Public Health, University of Cambridge, UK.
2
Alzheimer Europe, Luxembourg.
3
Erasmus MC, Rotterdam, The Netherlands.
4
Pasqual Maragall Foundation, Barcelona, Spain.
5
Imperial College, London, UK.

Abstract

Biomedical research aimed at the development of therapies for chronic and late-onset conditions increasingly concentrates on the early treatment of symptom-less disease. This broad trend is evidenced in prominent shifts in contemporary dementia research. Revised diagnostic criteria and new approaches to clinical trials propose a focus on earlier stages of disease and prompt concerns about the implications of communicating test results associated with the risk of developing dementia when no effective treatments are available. This article examines expectations of the implications of learning test results related to dementia risk, based on focus group research conducted in the UK and Spain. It points to the extended social and temporal aspects of the dementia risk experience. Three key dimensions of this risk experience are elaborated: living 'at risk', represented in efforts to reduce risk and plan for the future; 'with risk', through vigilance towards cognitive health and earlier or prolonged contact with healthcare services; and finally, 'beyond risk' through a cessation of the self in its current social, legal and financial form. A virtual abstract of this paper can be viewed at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC_979cmCmR9rLrKuD7z0ycA.

Link between lack of sleep and obesity in children

Link between lack of sleep and obesity in children



"The findings showed that children and adolescents who get less than the recommended amount of sleep for their age are at a higher risk of gaining more weight.
Overall, they were 58 per cent more likely to become overweight or obese — a common risk factor for various cardio-metabolic diseases."

Monday, April 16, 2018

Dave Brubeck's Timeless Take Five

Always fun. 



Dave Brubeck - Take Five

Differences In Muscle Mass May Explain The Obesity Paradox

Differences In Muscle Mass May Explain The Obesity Paradox


  • The likelihood of having a stroke, heart attack, heart failure or cardiovascular death in overweight middle-aged men 40 to 59 years old was 21 percent higher than in normal weight men. The odds were 32 percent higher in overweight women than normal weight women.

Sunday, April 15, 2018

From Liron Pantanowitz and colleagues: Augmented Reality Technology Using Microsoft HoloLens in Anatomic Pathology

Matthew G. HannaMD;
Ishtiaque AhmedBS;
Jeffrey NineMD;
Shyam PrajapatiDO;
Liron PantanowitzMD
Corresponding author: Liron Pantanowitz, MD, Department of Pathology, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Shadyside Hospital, Suite 201, 5150 Centre Ave, Pittsburgh, PA 15232 (email: ).
Context.— Augmented reality (AR) devices such as the Microsoft HoloLens have not been well used in the medical field.
Objective.— To test the HoloLens for clinical and nonclinical applications in pathology.
Design.— A Microsoft HoloLens was tested for virtual annotation during autopsy, viewing 3D gross and microscopic pathology specimens, navigating whole slide images, telepathology, as well as real-time pathology-radiology correlation.
Results.— Pathology residents performing an autopsy wearing the HoloLens were remotely instructed with real-time diagrams, annotations, and voice instruction. 3D-scanned gross pathology specimens could be viewed as holograms and easily manipulated. Telepathology was supported during gross examination and at the time of intraoperative consultation, allowing users to remotely access a pathologist for guidance and to virtually annotate areas of interest on specimens in real-time. The HoloLens permitted radiographs to be coregistered on gross specimens and thereby enhanced locating important pathologic findings. The HoloLens also allowed easy viewing and navigation of whole slide images, using an AR workstation, including multiple coregistered tissue sections facilitating volumetric pathology evaluation.
Conclusions.— The HoloLens is a novel AR tool with multiple clinical and nonclinical applications in pathology. The device was comfortable to wear, easy to use, provided sufficient computing power, and supported high-resolution imaging. It was useful for autopsy, gross and microscopic examination, and ideally suited for digital pathology. Unique applications include remote supervision and annotation, 3D image viewing and manipulation, telepathology in a mixed-reality environment, and real-time pathology-radiology correlation.

"There was a significant risk of dying for every 2 inches increase in the waist even if the person was not overweight."

Studies show connection between excess weight, cancer

A Mayo Clinic study found there was a significant risk of dying for every 2 inches increase in the waist.



"In 2014, the Mayo Clinic reported on studies done on 650,000 white men and women ages 20 to 83. There was a significant risk of dying for every 2 inches increase in the waist even if the person was not overweight."

J.T. Donaldson - New Tempo

J.T. Donaldson - New Tempo 

The Importance of Protesters' Morals: Moral Obligation as a Key Variable to Understand Collective Action

 2018 Mar 27;9:418. doi: 10.3389/fpsyg.2018.00418. eCollection 2018.

The Importance of Protesters' Morals: Moral Obligation as a Key Variable to Understand Collective Action.

Author information

1
Departamento de Psicoloxía Social, Básica e Metodoloxía, Facultade de Psicoloxía, Universidade de Santiago de Compostela, Santiago de Compostela, Spain.

Abstract

Collective action and protest have become a normalized political behavior that in many cases defines the political agenda. The reasons why people take to the streets constitute a central subject within the study of social psychology. In the literature, three precedents of protest that have been established as central to the study of this phenomenon are: injustice, efficacy, and identity. But political action is also deeply related to moral values. This explains why in recent years some moral constructs have also been pointed out as predictors of collective action. Moral variables have been introduced into the literature with little consideration to how they relate to each other. Thus, work in this direction is needed. The general aim of this research is to differentiate moral obligation from moral norms and moral conviction, as well as to compare their ability to predict collective action. In order to do so, the research objectives are: (a) conceptualize and operationalize moral obligation (Study 1, N = 171); (b) test its predictive power for intention to participate in protests (Study 2, N = 622); and (c) test moral obligation in a real context (Study 3, N = 407). Results are encouraging, showing not only that moral obligation is different to moral conviction and moral norm, but also that it is a more effective predictor working both for intention and real participation. This work therefore presents moral obligation as a key precedent of protest participation, prompting its future use as a variable that can enhance existing predictive models of collective action. Results regarding other variables are also discussed.

Physicians' political preferences and the delivery of end of life care in the United States

 2018 Apr 11;361:k1161. doi: 10.1136/bmj.k1161.

Physicians' political preferences and the delivery of end of life care in the United States: retrospective observational study.

Author information

1
Department of Health Care Policy, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115, USA jena@hcp.med.harvard.edu.
2
Department of Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA, USA.
3
National Bureau of Economic Research, Cambridge, MA, USA.
4
Department of Economics, Columbia University, New York, NY, USA.
5
Department of Healthcare Policy and Research, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, NY, USA.
6
Department of Medicine, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, NY, USA.
7
Department of Political Science, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, USA.
8
Department of Politics, New York University, New York, NY, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

To compare the delivery of end of life care given to US Medicare beneficiaries in hospital by internal medicine physicians with Republican versus Democrat political affiliations.

DESIGN:

Retrospective observational study.

SETTING:

US Medicare.

PARTICIPANTS:

Random sample of Medicare beneficiaries, who were admitted to hospital in 2008-12 with a general medical condition, and died in hospital or shortly thereafter.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

Total inpatient spending, intensive care unit use, and intensive end of life treatments (eg, mechanical ventilation and gastrostomy tube insertion) among patients dying in hospital, and hospice referral among patients discharged but at high predicted risk of 30 day mortality after discharge. Physicians were categorized as Democrat, Republican, or non-donors, using federal political contribution data.

RESULTS:

Among 1 480 808 patients, 93 976 (6.3%) were treated by 1523 Democratic physicians, 58 876 (4.0%) by 768 Republican physicians, and 1 327 956 (89.6%) by 23 627 non-donor physicians. Patient demographics and clinical characteristics were similar between groups. Democrat physicians were younger, more likely to be female, and more likely to have graduated from a top 20 US medical school than Republican physicians. Mean end of life spending, after adjustment for patient covariates and hospital specific fixed effects, was US$17 938 (£12 872; €14 612) among Democrat physicians (95% confidence interval $17 176 to $18 700) and $18 409 among Republican physicians ($17 362 to $19 456; adjusted Republican v Democrat difference, $472 (-$803 to $1747), P=0.47). Intensive end of life treatments for patients who died in hospital did not vary by physician political affiliation. The proportion of patients discharged from hospital to hospice did not vary with physician political affiliation. Among patients in the top 5% of predicted risk of death 30 days after hospital discharge, adjusted proportions of patients discharged to hospice were 15.8%, 15.0%, and 15.2% among Democrat, Republican, and non-donor physicians, respectively (adjusted difference in proportion between Republicans v Democrats, -0.8% (-2.7% to 0.9%), P=0.43).

CONCLUSIONS:

This study provided no evidence that physician political affiliation is associated with the intensity of end of life care received by patients in hospital. Other treatments for politically polarised healthcare issues should be investigated.

Barry White & Love Unlimited Orchestra - Love's Theme #DiscoLives

Barry White & Love Unlimited Orchestra - Love's Theme


#1 Billboard Top 100, February 1974

Pluripotent Stem Cell-based therapy for Parkinson's disease: current status and future prospects

 2018 Apr 10. pii: S0301-0082(17)30104-1. doi: 10.1016/j.pneurobio.2018.04.005. [Epub ahead of print]

Pluripotent Stem Cell-based therapy for Parkinson's disease: current status and future prospects.

Author information

1
Department of Psychiatry, McLean Hospital, Harvard Medical School, United States; Laboratory for Translational Research on Neurodegeneration, United States; Program for Neuropsychiatric Research, 115 Mill Street, Belmont, MA, 02478, United States.
2
Department of Psychiatry, McLean Hospital, Harvard Medical School, United States; Molecular Neurobiology Laboratory, Program in Neuroscience and Harvard Stem Cell Institute, McLean Hospital, Harvard Medical School, 115 Mill Street, Belmont, MA, 02478, United States.
3
Kaiser Permanente Medical Group, Irvine, CA, 92618, United States.
4
Department of Pediatrics, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, 02115, United States; Computational Health Informatics Program, Boston Children's Hospital, Boston, MA, 02115, United States.
5
Department of Neurosurgery, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA, 02114, United States.
6
Department of Neurosurgery, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA, 02114, United States. Electronic address: JSCHWEITZER1@MGH.HARVARD.EDU.
7
Department of Psychiatry, McLean Hospital, Harvard Medical School, United States; Molecular Neurobiology Laboratory, Program in Neuroscience and Harvard Stem Cell Institute, McLean Hospital, Harvard Medical School, 115 Mill Street, Belmont, MA, 02478, United States. Electronic address: kskim@mclean.harvard.edu.

Abstract

Parkinson's disease (PD) is one of the most common neurodegenerative disorders, which affects about 0.3% of the general population. As the population in the developed world ages, this creates an escalating burden on society both in economic terms and in quality of life for these patients and for the families that support them. Although currently available pharmacological or surgical treatments may significantly improve the quality of life of many patients with PD, these are symptomatic treatments that do not slow or stop the progressive course of the disease. Because motor impairments in PD largely result from loss of midbrain dopamine neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta, PD has long been considered to be one of the most promising target diseases for cell-based therapy. Indeed, numerous clinical and preclinical studies using fetal cell transplantation have provided proof of concept that cell replacement therapy may be a viable therapeutic approach for PD. However, the use of human fetal cells as a standardized therapeutic regimen has been fraught with fundamental ethical, practical, and clinical issues, prompting scientists to explore alternative cell sources. Based on groundbreaking establishments of human embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells, these human pluripotent stem cells have been the subject of extensive research, leading to tremendous advancement in our understanding of these novel classes of stem cells and promising great potential for regenerative medicine. In this review, we discuss the prospects and challenges of human pluripotent stem cell-based cell therapy for PD.

Living near a green space may not have any impact on obesity

Living near a green space may not have any impact on obesity


"HAVING A GREEN space in the area around your home may not have any impact on the amount of exercise you take or on local levels of obesity, according to new Irish research."

Natasha Rekhtman: Commentary on Testing of Non-adenocarcinomas #lcsm

Natasha RekhtmanMD, PhD
From the Department of Pathology, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York.
Corresponding author: Natasha Rekhtman, MD, PhD, Department of Pathology, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, 1275 York Ave, New York, NY (email: ).

Thursday, April 12, 2018

"Because the blood-testing system was inconsistent in generating results, Theranos staffers had recorded a result from one of the times it worked to display in the demonstration. And when the CFO raised concern about that with Holmes? He was fired on the spot." #WhyPathologistsMatter

‘Therabros’ and ‘disappeared’ staffers: the 8 juiciest things we learned from John Carreyrou’s new book



"In an episode reported for the first time in the book, Carreyrou describes a surreal scene from 2006, in which the company’s first chief financial officer learned that Theranos had deceived Novartis executives in demonstrating its technology at a pitch meeting in Switzerland. The trick: Because the blood-testing system was inconsistent in generating results, Theranos staffers had recorded a result from one of the times it worked to display in the demonstration.
And when the CFO raised concern about that with Holmes? He was fired on the spot."


HT:NS



"...during four years of college, the percentage of students overweight or obese rose from 23% to 41% — a 78% increase."

Starvation issues in universities? The real college problem is obesity.


"In lieu of this statistical charade, far more solid data exist on college students’ health and diets. Rather than being perpetually famished, 70% of college students gain weight during their undergrad years.
2017 Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior report found that during four years of college, the percentage of students overweight or obese rose from 23% to 41% — a 78% increase.
And few students are svelte when they arrived on campus: High school students were 30 times more likely to be overweight than underweight, according to a study published in Obesity Research." 

Wednesday, April 11, 2018

What’s the best diet plan? USC doctors evaluate 4 popular trends

What’s the best diet plan? USC doctors evaluate 4 popular trends

Before trying that trendy diet your friends raved about on Instagram, learn the science behind them first.


"Thinking of trying that trendy diet your friends raved about on Instagram? Before you’re ready to declare the latest celebrity fad the best diet plan, check the science first. While many diets promise quick weight loss, they often have a downside. We asked two USC experts to help us separate truth from hype for four popular diets that many claim to be the best diet plan."

Monday, April 9, 2018

How fat tissue shunts energy to tumors

How fat tissue shunts energy to tumors

The loss of p62 curtails energy-consuming activities in fat cells, leaving more nutrients available for tumor growth



"Specifically, they found that p62 deficiency in fat cells promotes the progression and metastasis of prostate cancer in mice by inhibiting a protein complex called mTORC1. The tumors suppress energy-consuming activities such as fat cell development, a metabolic process called oxidative phosphorylation, and fatty acid metabolism in white fat tissue. As a result, more fatty acids and other nutrients are available to support tumor growth. "This metabolic reprograming orchestrated by the loss of p62 in adipocytes appears to help tumors cope with the high-energy demands of an aggressive cancer," Diaz-Meco says."

Saturday, April 7, 2018

Why #DiscoLives

Why #DiscoLives

@UArkansas Researchers Link Obesity to Community Characteristics

U of A Researchers Link Obesity to Community Characteristics

Our results indicate a clear connection between obesity prevalence, income inequality, and the racial and ethnic population composition across census tracts in the 500 largest U.S. cities,” the report states.
They found a connection between obesity levels and sociodemographic and economic characteristics such as race, income inequality, education level, and age and value of housing.

Friday, April 6, 2018

Beyond Consent: Building Trusting Relationships With Diverse Populations in Precision Medicine Research

 2018 Apr;18(4):3-20. doi: 10.1080/15265161.2018.1431322.

Beyond Consent: Building Trusting Relationships With Diverse Populations in Precision Medicine Research.

Author information

1
a Seattle Children's Research Institute.
2
b Stanford University.
3
c Palo Alto Medical Foundation Research Institute.

Abstract

With the growth of precision medicine research on health data and biospecimens, research institutions will need to build and maintain long-term, trusting relationships with patient-participants. While trust is important for all research relationships, the longitudinal nature of precision medicine research raises particular challenges for facilitating trust when the specifics of future studies are unknown. Based on focus groups with racially and ethnically diverse patients, we describe several factors that influence patient trust and potential institutional approaches to building trustworthiness. Drawing on these findings, we suggest several considerations for research institutions seeking to cultivate long-term, trusting relationships with patients: (1) Address the role of history and experience on trust, (2) engage concerns about potential group harm, (3) address cultural values and communication barriers, and (4) integrate patient values and expectations into oversight and governance structures.

The Brothers Johnson - Stomp! #DiscoLives

The Brothers Johnson - Stomp!

"But where might we find joy? Joy lies in immaterial superfluity. I find it in the long hours spent reading a book..."

The Time for Art Is Now

"But where might we find joy? Joy lies in immaterial superfluity. I find it in the long hours spent reading a book. I make this suggestion advisedly: to watch a film or a video is not the same satisfaction; when reading a book you create, for yourself, from marks upon a page, an entire, vivid interior world. You are spurred, of course, by the author, but in its particulars uniquely and fully your own. Or you might find it in communing with a painting, sculpture, or installation until you feel you’re part of it, or it is part of you. Or in lying in a summer field looking up at the dusk sky unfolding from palest pink to indigo, the awakening of the stars. Or in what Christopher Hitchens used to call “the ruined table”—the afternoon or evening lost in eager conversation long after the meal is finished, best enjoyed surrounded by empty bottles, dirty plates, and crumbs. Or in an afternoon ramble without direction or a timepiece, or in an evening spent listening to music—any music, anywhere."

"Perhaps he hopes to keep you, too, from coming to terms with it, by literally dressing as a child, in T-shirts, hoodies and jeans—soft clothes, the kind 5-year-olds favor."


If Adults Won’t Grow Up, Nobody Will



"Facebook ’s failings are now famous and so far include but are perhaps not limited to misusing, sharing and scraping of private user data, selling space to Russian propagandists in the 2016 campaign, playing games with political content, starving journalism of ad revenues, increasing polarization, and turning eager users into the unknowing product. The signal fact of Mr. Zuckerberg is that he is supremely gifted in one area—monetizing technical expertise by marrying it to a canny sense of human weakness. Beyond that, what a shallow and banal figure. He too appears to have difficulties coming to terms with who he is. Perhaps he hopes to keep you, too, from coming to terms with it, by literally dressing as a child, in T-shirts, hoodies and jeans—soft clothes, the kind 5-year-olds favor. In interviews he presents an oddly blank look, as if perhaps his audiences will take blankness for innocence. As has been said here, he is like one of those hollow-eyed busts of forgotten Caesars you see in museums.
But he is no child; he is a giant bestride the age, a titan, one of the richest men not only in the world but in the history of the world. His power is awesome."

HT:MC

Perceived emotion suppression and culture: Effects on psychological well-being

 2018 Apr 3. doi: 10.1002/ijop.12486. [Epub ahead of print]

Perceived emotion suppression and culture: Effects on psychological well-being.

Author information

1
Department of Psychology, Yonsei University, Seoul, South Korea.

Abstract

Whether the negative effects of emotion suppression on psychological well-being are applicable cross-culturally is a long-debated topic. The present study attempted to shed light on this debate, focusing on the effects of perceived emotion suppression and examining the psychological processes leading from perceived emotion suppression to lower psychological well-being. We used a scale manipulation to lead 196 American and 213 Chinese participants to perceive themselves as having suppressed their emotions to a greater or lesser extent and then measured their life satisfaction. As expected, both the American and Chinese participants reported lower life satisfaction in the high-suppression condition than in the low-suppression condition; this negative effect was mediated by positive affect and moderated by self-esteem. Specifically, perceived high emotion suppression decreased positive affect, which in turn led to lower well-being. This effect was observed only for those with low self-esteem, but the patterns and mechanisms were consistent cross-culturally.