Sunday, November 19, 2017

"If the moment is all we have, then all we can do is pursue pleasurable moments, ones that dissolve as swiftly as they appear, leaving us always running on empty, grasping at fleeting experiences that pass."

I still love Kierkegaard

He is the dramatic thunderstorm at the heart of philosophy and his provocation is more valuable than ever




The limitations of the ‘ethical’ are perhaps most obvious to the modern mind. The life of eternity is just an illusion, for we are all-too mortal, flesh-and-blood creatures. To believe we belong there is to live in denial of our animality. So the world has increasingly embraced the ‘aesthetic’. But this fails to satisfy us, too. If the moment is all we have, then all we can do is pursue pleasurable moments, ones that dissolve as swiftly as they appear, leaving us always running on empty, grasping at fleeting experiences that pass. The materialistic world offers innumerable opportunities for instant gratification without enduring satisfaction and so life becomes a series of diversions. No wonder there is still so much vague spiritual yearning in the West: people long for the ethical but cannot see beyond the aesthetic.

Servicemen killed in WWII to finally be buried in California


The Defense Department says Army Air Forces 1st Lt. Homer Spence and Marine Corps Reserve Assistant Cook Frank Masoni will be buried Saturday with military honors. Spence's funeral is in Manteca, and the service for Masoni is in Gilroy.
The plane Spence was piloting disappeared during a mission over southern Germany in July 1944. He was 22. The wreckage was found in 2010, and Spence's remains were identified using DNA analysis.
Masoni was killed in November 1943 during a battle with Japanese forces on an island in the Pacific Ocean. He was 21. His remains were identified using dental and other records.

"...people do not regain weight because they lack willpower."

For Better Health, Trim Weight-Loss Goals



The good news is that, thanks to groundbreaking obesity research conducted during the last few decades, we now know why it is so hard to sustain weight loss. Since the 1980s, when most scientists thought fat cells were inert storage vessels, we have discovered that they are in fact engines in a vast and complicated network,which interacts with the brain to control hunger, metabolic rates, and other key functions.
Unfortunately, these insights into how our bodies work have not led to reliable interventions to control them. This suggests two lessons. First, people do not regain weight because they lack willpower. Instead, their best efforts are countered by powerful biological responses that fight them at every turn. The second lesson comes from my University of Michigan colleague, Dr. Charles Burant: “Don’t get heavy in the first place.”

The Effects of Malpractice Non-Economic Damage Caps on the Supply of Physician Labor: Heterogeneity by Physician Age and Risk

 2017 Jun;50:7-14. doi: 10.1016/j.irle.2017.03.002. Epub 2017 Mar 21.

The Effects of Malpractice Non-Economic Damage Caps on the Supply of Physician Labor: Heterogeneity by Physician Age and Risk.

Author information

1
Division of Health Policy and Economics, Department of Healthcare Policy and Research, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, NY.
2
Boston University School of Medicine.
3
Division of General Internal Medicine, Department of Medicine, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, NY.

Abstract

We explore the impact of malpractice caps on non-economic damages that were enacted between 2003 and 2006 on the supply of physician labor, separately for high-malpractice risk and low-malpractice risk physician specialty types, and separately by young and old physicians. We use physician data from the Area Resource File for 2000-2011 and malpractice policy data from the Database of State Tort Law Reforms. We study the impact of these caps using a reverse natural experiment, comparing physician supply in nine states enacting new caps to physician supply in ten states that had malpractice caps in place throughout the full time period. We use an event study to evaluate changes in physician labor compared to the prior year. We find evidence that non-economic damage caps increased the supply of high-risk physicians <35 years of age by 0.93 physicians per 100,000 people in the year after the caps were enacted. Non-economic damage caps were cumulatively associated with an increase of 2.1 high-risk physicians <35 years of age per 100,000 people. Stronger non-economic damage caps generally had a larger impact on physical supply.

"The key to success in diabetes prevention starts with promoting behavior changes..."

A silent killer than can be prevented


The key to success in diabetes prevention starts with promoting behaviour changes, for example, losing weight, having an active lifestyle, incorporating more fibre into the daily diet, avoiding consuming food high in saturated fats and stopping drinking and smoking. The more changes people make to their lifestyle, the less likely they are to develop diabetes. Moreover, it is essential that individuals who are at risk of developing diabetes get regular blood glucose tests to allow for early diagnosis. Screening for diabetes can assess the risk of developing this chronic disease in the future, which will not only prevent diabetes, but also stop prediabetes from progressing.

From UNC: Medical Abortion Reversal: Science and Politics Meet

 2017 Nov 12. pii: S0002-9378(17)32320-7. doi: 10.1016/j.ajog.2017.11.555. [Epub ahead of print]

Medical Abortion Reversal: Science and Politics Meet.

Author information

1
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of North Carolina School of Medicine.
2
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of North Carolina School of Medicine. Electronic address: antoinette_nguyen@med.unc.edu.

Abstract

Medical abortion is a safe, effective, and acceptable option for patients seeking an early non-surgical abortion. In 2014, medical abortion accounted for nearly one-third (31%) of all abortions performed in the United States. State-level attempts to restrict reproductive and sexual health have recently included bills that require physicians to inform women that a medical abortion is reversible. In this commentary, we will review the history, current evidence-based regimen, and regulation of medical abortion. We will then examine current proposed and existing abortion reversal legislation. The objective of this commentary is to ensure physicians are armed with rigorous evidence to inform patients, communities, and policy makers about the safety of medical abortion. Furthermore, given the current paucity of evidence for medical abortion reversal, physicians and policymakers can dispel bad science and misinformation and advocate against medical abortion reversal legislation.

Ethics, health policy, and Zika: From emergency to global epidemic?

 2017 Nov 16. pii: medethics-2017-104389. doi: 10.1136/medethics-2017-104389. [Epub ahead of print]

Ethics, health policy, and Zika: From emergency to global epidemic?

Author information

1
Monash Bioethics Centre, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria, Australia.
2
Department of General Medicine, Royal Melbourne Hospital, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.

Abstract

Zika virus was recognised in 2016 as an important vector-borne cause of congenital malformations and Guillain-Barré syndrome, during a major epidemic in Latin America, centred in Northeastern Brazil. The WHO and Pan American Health Organisation (PAHO), with partner agencies, initiated a coordinated global response including public health intervention and urgent scientific research, as well as ethical analysis as a vital element of policy design. In this paper, we summarise the major ethical issues raised during the Zika epidemic, highlighting the PAHO ethics guidance and the role of ethics in emergency responses, before turning to ethical issues that are yet to be resolved. Zika raises traditional bioethical issues related to reproduction, prenatal diagnosis of serious malformations and unjust disparities in health outcomes. But the epidemic has also highlighted important issues of growing interest in public health ethics, such as the international spread of infectious disease; the central importance of reproductive healthcare in preventing maternal and neonatal morbidity and mortality; diagnostic and reporting biases; vector control and the links between vectors, climate change, and disparities in the global burden of disease. Finally, there are controversies regarding Zika vaccine research and eventual deployment. Zika virus was a neglected disease for over 50 years before the outbreak in Brazil. As it continues to spread, public health agencies should promote gender equity and disease control efforts in Latin America, while preparing for the possibility of a global epidemic.

Female friendly facilities will herald a new inclusive era for sports in Tasmania

Female friendly facilities will herald a new inclusive era for sports in Tasmania



“Build it and they will come” should be the mantra for Tasmania’s politicians and sports administrators that will see all the state’s athletes, be they male or female, have the best chance to shine and have a long, rewarding sporting life.

Racial differences in symptom management experiences during breast cancer treatment

 2017 Nov 18. doi: 10.1007/s00520-017-3965-4. [Epub ahead of print]

Racial differences in symptom management experiences during breast cancer treatment.

Author information

1
Department of Health Policy and Management, Gillings School of Global Public Health, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, 1105F McGavran-Greenberg Hall, CB#7411, Chapel Hill, NC, 27599-7411, USA. cleo_samuel@unc.edu.
2
Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, 450 West Drive, Chapel Hill, NC, 27599, USA. cleo_samuel@unc.edu.
3
The Partnership Project, 620 S. Elm St, Suite 381, Greensboro, NC, 27406, USA.
4
Department of Medicine, University of Pittsburgh, 5150 Centre Avenue, POB 2 Room, 438, Pittsburgh, PA, 15232, USA.
5
Department of Health Policy and Management, Gillings School of Global Public Health, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, 1105F McGavran-Greenberg Hall, CB#7411, Chapel Hill, NC, 27599-7411, USA.
6
Department of Public Health Studies, Elon University, Campus Box 2337, Elon, NC, 27224, USA.
7
Department of Health Behavior, Gillings School of Global Public Health, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC, 27599, USA.
8
Cancer Health Disparities Training Program, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, 135 Dauer Drive, CB#7440, Chapel Hill, NC, 27599-7440, USA.
9
Department of Public Health Education, University of North Carolina at Greensboro, 437 Coleman Building, P.O. Box 26170, Greensboro, NC, 27402-6169, USA.
10
Department of Public Health Education, North Carolina Central University, 1801 Fayetteville St, Durham, NC, 27701, USA.
11
Sisters Network Greensboro, P.O. Box 20304, Greensboro, NC, 27420, USA.
12
Guilford College, 5800 W Friendly Ave, Greensboro, NC, 27410, USA.
13
Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, 450 West Drive, Chapel Hill, NC, 27599, USA.
14
School of Medicine, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, 5034 Old Clinic Building, CB#7110, Chapel Hill, NC, 27599, USA.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

Racial disparities in cancer treatment-related symptom burden are well documented and linked to worse treatment outcomes. Yet, little is known about racial differences in patients' treatment-related symptom management experiences. Such understanding can help identify modifiable drivers of symptom burden inequities. As part of the Cancer Health Accountability for Managing Pain and Symptoms (CHAMPS) study, we examined racial differences in symptom management experiences among Black and White breast cancer survivors (BCS).

METHODS:

We conducted six focus groups (n = 3 Black BCS groups; n = 3 White BCS groups) with 22 stages I-IV BCS at two cancer centers. Focus groups were audio-recorded and transcribed verbatim. Based on key community-based participatory research principles, our community/academic/medical partner team facilitated focus groups and conducted qualitative analyses.

RESULTS:

All BCS described positive symptom management experiences, including clinician attentiveness to symptom concerns and clinician recommendations for pre-emptively managing symptoms. Black BCS commonly reported having to advocate for themselves to get information about treatment-related symptoms, and indicated dissatisfaction regarding clinicians' failure to disclose potential treatment-related symptoms or provide medications to address symptoms. White BCS often described dissatisfaction regarding inadequate information on symptom origins and clinicians' failure to offer reassurance.

CONCLUSIONS:

This study elucidates opportunities for future research aimed at improving equity for cancer treatment-related symptom management. For Black women, warnings about anticipated symptoms and treatment for ongoing symptoms were particular areas of concern. Routine symptom assessment for all women, as well as clinicians' management of symptoms for racially diverse cancer patients, need to be more thoroughly studied and addressed.

"Obesity could BANKRUPT the NHS"

'Obesity could BANKRUPT the NHS' A growing number of obese children undergoes joint ops

CHILDREN as young as 10 are having to undergo joint replacements due to damage caused by obesity, shocking new figures show.



Tam Fry, chairman of the National Obesity Forum, said: “This is tragic. 
“Teenagers are still growing and their growth plates are not fused, so a replacement is extremely serious for them. 
“Without surgery they might be crippled. 
“Obesity is not only causing an increased risk of cancer, heart disease and diabetes but also serious weight‑related joint damage.  
“The cost of the obesity epidemic could bankrupt the NHS.”  

Saturday, November 18, 2017

"Sarcopenia is now recognized as a major clinical problem for older people."

Poorer health influences muscle strength in later life


Accelerated loss of muscle mass and strength in older age is called sarcopenia, and can in turn affect balance, gait and overall ability to perform tasks of daily living. It is common in older people and is associated with disability, a higher risk of mortality and significant health care costs.
Professor Cyrus Cooper, Director of the MRC LEU, said: "Sarcopenia is now recognised as a major clinical problem for . We know that poor diets and being physically inactive are common in  and contribute to the condition.

Battle over veterans’ health care comes down to VA Choice

Battle over veterans’ health care comes down to VA Choice


Because health care dollars follow the veteran, the migration of dollars out of the system affected the operating budgets at the VA facility programs. VA medical and regional directors wrote in an internal VA memo that the costs of outsourcing veterans’ care to the private sector has been a “major driver, in budget shortfalls for Veterans Health Administration facilities across the country.”

Carbs, not fats, are the problem

Deadly sugar addiction – why carbs, not fats, are the problem


Research shows that sugar affects the brain in the same ways as cocaine or heroin. Scans show identical areas of the brain light up when exposed to drugs or sugar.
“Sugar addiction is really no different than opioid addiction. People have looked at all these things that are similar to opioid addiction,” Lehman said. “It’s a real effort, it’s not as easy as saying, ‘Hey, I’m going to eat junk food.’”
So how did all the companies get it so wrong with the low-fat craze?
The American Medical Association Journal reported last year sugar companies paid researchers in the 1960s and 1970s to downplay the role sugar has on health. And with that research, the blame shifted to fatty foods. So to make low fat foods taste better, sugar-based additives were put in most everything.
“When we all believed that fats are bad and carbs were good, so we were eating low-fat cookies and low-fat food, and what happened to America? We got immense. We got giant,” Lehman said.

Structured Annual Faculty Review Program Accelerates Professional Development and Promotion

 2017 Mar 1;4:2374289516689471. doi: 10.1177/2374289516689471. eCollection 2017 Jan-Dec.

Structured Annual Faculty Review Program Accelerates Professional Development and Promotion: Long-Term Experience of the Duke University Medical Center's Pathology Department.

Author information

1
Department of Pathology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC, USA.

Abstract

This retrospective observational study on faculty development analyzes the Duke University Pathology Department's 18-year experience with a structured mentoring program involving 51 junior faculty members. The majority had MD degrees only (55%). The percentage of young women faculty hires before 1998 was 25%, increasing to 72% after 2005. Diversity also broadened from 9% with varied heritages before 1998 to 37% since then. The mentoring process pivoted on an annual review process. The reviews generally helped candidates focus much earlier, identified impediments they individually felt, and provided new avenues to gain a national reputation for academic excellence. National committee membership effectively helped gain national exposure. Thirty-eight percent of the mentees served on College of American Pathologists (CAP) committees, exponential multiples of any other national society. Some used CAP resources to develop major programs, some becoming nationally and internationally recognized for their academic activities. Several faculty gained national recognition as thought leaders for publishing about work initiated to serve administrative needs in the Department. The review process identified the need for more protected time for research, issues with time constraints, and avoiding exploitation when collaborating with other departments. This review identified a rigorous faculty mentoring and review process that included annual career counseling, goal-oriented academic careers, monitored advancement to promotion, higher salaries, and national recognition. All contributed to high faculty satisfaction and low faculty turnover. We conclude that a rigorous annual faculty review program and its natural sequence, promotion, can greatly foster faculty satisfaction.

How are lung cancer risk perceptions and cigarette smoking related?-testing an accuracy hypothesis

 2016 Oct;5(Suppl 5):S964-S971. doi: 10.21037/tcr.2016.10.75.

How are lung cancer risk perceptions and cigarette smoking related?-testing an accuracy hypothesis.

Author information

1
Department of Health and Kinesiology, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX, USA.
2
Department of Communication, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT, USA.
3
Huntsman Cancer Institute, Salt Lake City, UT, USA.
4
Department of Behavioral and Community Health Sciences, School of Public Health, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center, New Orleans, LA, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Subjective risk perception is an important theoretical construct in the field of cancer prevention and control. Although the relationship between subjective risk perception and health behaviors has been widely studied in many health contexts, the causalities and associations between the risk perception of developing lung cancer and cigarette smoking have been inconsistently reported among studies. Such inconsistency may be from discrepancies between study designs (cross-sectional versus longitudinal designs) and the three hypotheses (i.e., the behavior motivation hypothesis, the risk reappraisals hypothesis, and the accuracy hypothesis) testing different underlying associations between risk perception and cigarette-smoking behaviors. To clarify this issue, as an initial step, we examined the association between absolute and relative risk perceptions of developing lung cancer and cigarette-smoking behaviors among a large, national representative sample of 1,680 U.S. adults by testing an accuracy hypothesis (i.e., people who smoke accurately perceived a higher risk of developing lung cancer).

METHODS:

Data from the U.S. Health Information National Trends Survey (HINTS) were analyzed using logistic regression and multivariate linear regression to examine the associations between risk perception and cigarette-smoking behaviors among 1,680 U.S. adults.

RESULTS:

Findings from this cross-sectional survey suggest that absolute and relative risk perceptions were positively and significantly correlated with having smoked >100 cigarettes during lifetime and the frequency of cigarette smoking. Only absolute risk perception was significantly associated with the number of cigarettes smoked per day among current smokers.

CONCLUSIONS:

Because both absolute and relative risk perceptions are positively related to most cigarette-smoking behaviors, this study supports the accuracy hypothesis. Moreover, absolute risk perception might be a more sensitive measurement than relative risk perception for perceived lung cancer risk. Longitudinal research is needed in the future to investigate other types of risk perception-risk behavior hypotheses-the behavior motivation and the risk reappraisals hypotheses-among nationally representative samples to further examine the causations between risk perception of obtaining lung cancer and smoking behaviors.

Duplicity among the dark triad: Three faces of deceit

 2017 Aug;113(2):329-342. doi: 10.1037/pspp0000139. Epub 2017 Mar 2.

Duplicity among the dark triad: Three faces of deceit.

Author information

1
Department of Psychology, University of Texas at El Paso.
2
Department of Psychology, University of British Columbia.

Abstract

Although all 3 of the Dark Triad members are predisposed to engage in exploitative interpersonal behavior, their motivations and tactics vary. Here we explore their distinctive dynamics with 5 behavioral studies of dishonesty (total N = 1,750). All 3 traits predicted cheating on a coin-flipping task when there was little risk of being caught (Study 1). Only psychopathy predicted cheating when punishment was a serious risk (Study 2). Machiavellian individuals also cheated under high risk-but only if they were ego-depleted (Study 3). Both psychopathy and Machiavellianism predicted cheating when it required an intentional lie (Study 4). Finally, those high in narcissism showed the highest levels of self-deceptive bias (Study 5). In sum, duplicitous behavior is far from uniform across the Dark Triad members. The frequency and nature of their dishonesty is moderated by 3 contextual factors: level of risk, ego depletion, and target of deception. This evidence for distinctive forms of duplicity helps clarify differences among the Dark Triad members as well as illuminating different shades of dishonesty. 

"Total episode expenditures for cancer resections were lower when care was delivered at low-complication, high-quality hospitals."

 2017 Nov 17. doi: 10.1002/cncr.31120. [Epub ahead of print]

Hospital quality, patient risk, and Medicare expenditures for cancer surgery.

Author information

1
National Clinician Scholars Program at the Institute for Healthcare Policy & Innovation, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan.
2
Department of Surgery, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Surgical resection is a cornerstone of curative-intent therapy for patients with solid organ malignancies. With increasing attention paid to the costs of surgical care, there is a new focus on variations in the costs of cancer surgery. This study evaluated the potential interactive effect of hospital quality and patient risk on expenditures for cancer resections.

METHODS:

With 100% Medicare claim data for 2010-2013, patients aged 65 to 99 years who had undergone cancer resection were identified. Medicare payments were calculated for the surgical episode from the index admission through 30 days after discharge. Risk- and reliability-adjusted hospital rates of serious complications and mortality within 30 days of the index operation were assessed to categorize high- and low-quality hospitals.

RESULTS:

There was no difference in patient characteristics between the highest and lowest quality hospitals. There were substantial increases in expenditures for procedures performed at the lowest quality hospitals for each procedure. Increased expenditures at the lowest quality hospitals were found for all patients, but they were highest for the highest risk patients. At low-quality hospitals, low-risk patients undergoing pancreatectomy had payments of $29,080, whereas high-risk patients had average payments of $62,687; this was a difference of $33,607 per patient episode.

CONCLUSIONS:

Total episode expenditures for cancer resections were lower when care was delivered at low-complication, high-quality hospitals. Expenditure differences were particularly large for high-risk patients, and this suggests that the selective referral of high-risk patients to high-quality centers may be an effective strategy for optimizing value in cancer surgery. 

Correcting the Count: Improving Vital Statistics Data Regarding Deaths Related to Obesity

 2017 Nov 15. doi: 10.1111/1556-4029.13690. [Epub ahead of print]

Correcting the Count: Improving Vital Statistics Data Regarding Deaths Related to Obesity.

Author information

1
Department of Pathology, University of Alabama at Birmingham, 1515 6th Avenue SouthRoom 220, Birmingham, AL, 35233.

Abstract

Obesity can involve any organ system and compromise the overall health of an individual, including premature death. Despite the increased risk of death associated with being obese, obesity itself is infrequently indicated on the death certificate. We performed an audit of our records to identify how often "obesity" was listed on the death certificate to determine how our practices affected national mortality data collection regarding obesity-related mortality. During the span of nearly 25 years, 0.2% of deaths were attributed to or contributed by obesity. Over the course of 5 years, 96% of selected natural deaths were likely underreported as being associated with obesity. We present an algorithm for certifiers to use to determine whether obesity should be listed on the death certificate and guidelines for certifying cases in which this is appropriate. Use of this algorithm will improve vital statistics concerning the role of obesity in causing or contributing to death.

"When organ tourists return to the United States and need another transplant, do US transplant physicians have an obligation to place them on a transplant list?"

 2017 Nov 15;42(6):670-689. doi: 10.1093/jmp/jhx021.

The Ethics of Organ Tourism: Role Morality and Organ Transplantation.

Author information

1
University at Albany, State University of New York, Albany, New York, USA.

Abstract

Organ tourism occurs when individuals in countries with existing organ transplant procedures, such as the United States, are unable to procure an organ by using those transplant procedures in enough time to save their life. In this paper, I am concerned with the following question: When organ tourists return to the United States and need another transplant, do US transplant physicians have an obligation to place them on a transplant list? I argue that transplant physicians have a duty not to relist organ tourists. Specifically, I contend that we should locate physicians' duties in these cases within the new role of "transplant physician." This role results from transplant physicians' participation in a system that depends on organ donors' voluntary act of donation.

"Public health experts say that telling people how to eat healthier isn’t changing behavior."

Now I Get It: America’s growing obesity problem


"Public health experts say that telling people how to eat healthier isn’t changing behavior. They’re urging lawmakers to create new policies that will change the food environment, making it easier for people to make healthy choices."

"If the Midwest is a particular place that instead thinks of itself as an anyplace or no-place, it is likewise both present and not present in the national conversation."

On Being Midwestern: The Burden of Normality

Phil Christman

When, looking in your own mind for a sense of your own experiences in a region, you find only clichés and evasions—well, that is a clue worth following. So I began, here and there, collecting tidbits, hoarding anecdotes, savoring every chance piece of evidence that the Midwest was a distinctive region with its own history. In doing so I noticed yet another paradox: If the Midwest is a particular place that instead thinks of itself as an anyplace or no-place, it is likewise both present and not present in the national conversation. The Midwest is, in fact, fairly frequently written about, but almost always in a way that weirdly disclaims the possibility that it has ever been written or thought about before. The trope of featurelessness is matched by a trope of neglect (for what can one do with what is featureless but neglect it?). Katy Rossing, a poet and essayist, has described the formula: 
1. Begin with a loquacious description of the Euclidean-flat homogeneity of the landscape. This place looks boring. It looks like there’s nothing here worth thinking about. Example: “The sins of the Midwest: flatness, emptiness, a necessary acceptance of the familiar. Where is the romance in being buried alive? In growing old?” (Stewart O’Nan, Songs for the Missing)
2. In fact, it seems no one has really thought about it before, they all write. What IS the Midwest? The West, South, and East all have clear stories, stories that are told and retold in regionally interested textbooks, novels, movies. The Midwest? It’s a humorously ingenuous, blank foil for another region. Example: Fargo, Annie Hall.
3. But wait a minute, the writers tell you, it turns out this place isn’t empty at all! They spend the remainder of the article crouched in a defensive posture.10

What makes a researcher wise?

 2017 Nov;12(6):1148-1152. doi: 10.1177/1745691617727528.

… and the Wisdom to Know the Difference: Scholarly Success From a Wisdom Perspective.

Author information

1
Department of Developmental Psychology, University of Klagenfurt.

Abstract

What makes a researcher wise? At least for the field of psychology, I argue that the two main characteristics of scholarly wisdom are a desire to understand, rather than to be right, and an orientation toward ethical values. These characteristics do not necessarily produce the highest levels of academic success. Because wisdom is partly context dependent, the actual wisdom of our scientific output could be increased by making some changes to our publication and evaluation culture-changes that might benefit our field and even the world around us.

'Fountain Of Youth': Amish Genetic Mutation Protects Against Aging


'Fountain Of Youth': Amish Genetic Mutation Protects Against Aging

Normally, the gene SERPINE1 makes PAI-1, a protein that is associated with aging. However, 43 of the 177 individuals tested were found to carry mutations on the gene. They were also found to have longer telomeres, or the protective caps at the end of our chromosomes, which is a biological marker of aging in which shorter telomeres are signs of aging.

Friday, November 17, 2017

Despite ACA cost protections, most adolescents skip regular checkups

Despite ACA cost protections, most adolescents skip regular checkups


"Before the health law passed in 2010, caregivers reported that 41 percent of children had a well-child visit in the previous year. After the ACA's preventive services protections became effective, typically in 2011, the rate climbed to 48 percent, a "moderate" increase, Adams said. The increase was greatest for minority and low-income groups.
Still, more than half of children in the survey didn't go to the doctor for routine care over the course of a year, even though many families gained insurance and wouldn't have owed anything for the visits."


Caring for the Tribe: From Addiction to Zen

 2017 Nov;15(6):578-580. doi: 10.1370/afm.2151.

Caring for the Tribe: From Addiction to Zen.

Author information

1
Seaport Community Health Center, Belfast, Maine david.loxterkamp@gmail.com.

Abstract

The culture of medicine is rapidly changing. The majority of primary care physicians are now employed, and the decisions that govern us are made farther and farther from the point of care. Our sense of well-being is threatened less by the demands of clinical practice than it is by the emptiness of our job: we have forgotten who we are working for, or working with, or why we are working at all. The solution lies in creating the kind of practice environment that we advocate for in each of our patients' lives.