Tuesday, February 13, 2018

I am a candidate for the College of American Pathologists President Elect, 2019 - 2021 term. My vision is here.

I am a candidate for the College of American Pathologists President Elect, 2019 - 2021 term.   My vision is here: https://sites.google.com/site/timothycraigallenmdjd/home 


Pathologists, non-pathology colleagues, patients and families, policymakers, and payers, please share with me your thoughts and concerns regarding opportunities, challenges, successes, failures, strengths, and weaknesses in pathology and laboratory medicine.


Best,

Tim

Tuesday, February 6, 2018

Clean eating

'Clean eating' has become such a sham that fast food chains are pushing it

None of the aggressive, judgmental pitches of the movement have ever been proven. The power of its association with the economic elite has, though.

"For instance, you can’t walk into Chipotle and miss their signs declaring that nothing on the premises is produced with GMOs. But even if we leave aside the truthiness of the assertion, who cares? The argument against GMOs has been as thoroughly debunkedas the anti-vaxxer mantra that vaccination causes autism. (It certainly is no antidote for E. coli.)"

Monday, February 5, 2018

"The researchers believe that noise pollution causes a surge in stress hormones, which appear to have harmful effects on the arteries in the heart and the rest of the body."

Everyday noises may cause increased risk of heart disease, experts say


"The researchers believe that noise pollution causes a surge in stress hormones, which appear to have harmful effects on the arteries in the heart and the rest of the body. While this new research cannot prove that noise causes heart disease, it does provide convincing evidence that stress, especially when it is generated by noise, is linked to big consequences for our health."

Obesity may make ignoring ‘food cues’ even harder

Obesity may make ignoring ‘food cues’ even harder



"When obesity-prone rats learned to recognize a certain sound as the cue for food availability, a key receptor appeared more frequently on the surface of certain cells in the reward center. But similar changes in this receptor were not seen in obesity-resistant rats.
What’s more, when researchers used a drug to block the receptors, called CP-AMPA receptors or CP-AMPARs, the food cue no longer triggered the obesity-prone rats to seek out food—even though they still showed signs that they recognized the cue.
It was as if they had switched from eagerly trying to trace the smell of pizza and go find its source to smelling it and not even getting up to find it.
Although a drug that could do the same for humans isn’t yet available, the researchers hope their work will help form the basis for new understanding of human obesity’s roots in our genes, learned behaviors and the brain."

Sunday, February 4, 2018

Role of Dietary Protein and Muscular Fitness on Longevity and Aging

 2018 Feb 1;9(1):119-132. doi: 10.14336/AD.2017.0202. eCollection 2018 Feb.

Role of Dietary Protein and Muscular Fitness on Longevity and Aging.

Author information

1
1Division of Medical Biochemistry, Biocenter, Medical University Innsbruck, Austria.
2
2Department of Prevention and Sports Medicine, TUM, Munich, Germany.
3
3Division of Biological Chemistry, Biocenter, Medical University Innsbruck, Austria.
4
4Department of Sport Science, Medical Section, University Innsbruck, Austria.

Abstract

Muscle atrophy is an unfortunate effect of aging and many diseases and can compromise physical function and impair vital metabolic processes. Low levels of muscular fitness together with insufficient dietary intake are major risk factors for illness and mortality from all causes. Ultimately, muscle wasting contributes significantly to weakness, disability, increased hospitalization, immobility, and loss of independence. However, the extent of muscle wasting differs greatly between individuals due to differences in the aging process per se as well as physical activity levels. Interventions for sarcopenia include exercise and nutrition because both have a positive impact on protein anabolism but also enhance other aspects that contribute to well-being in sarcopenic older adults, such as physical function, quality of life, and anti-inflammatory state. The process of aging is accompanied by chronic immune activation, and sarcopenia may represent a consequence of a counter-regulatory strategy of the immune system. Thereby, the kynurenine pathway is induced, and elevation in the ratio of kynurenine to tryptophan concentrations, which estimates the tryptophan breakdown rate, is often linked with inflammatory conditions and neuropsychiatric symptoms. A combined exercise program consisting of both resistance-type and endurance-type exercise may best help to ameliorate the loss of skeletal muscle mass and function, to prevent muscle aging comorbidities, and to improve physical performance and quality of life. In addition, the use of dietary protein supplementation can further augment protein anabolism but can also contribute to a more active lifestyle, thereby supporting well-being and active aging in the older population.

SFRP Tumour Suppressor Genes Are Potential Plasma-Based Epigenetic Biomarkers for Malignant Pleural Mesothelioma

 2017;2017:2536187. doi: 10.1155/2017/2536187. Epub 2017 Dec 13.

SFRP Tumour Suppressor Genes Are Potential Plasma-Based Epigenetic Biomarkers for Malignant Pleural Mesothelioma.

Author information

1
Asbestos Diseases Research Institute (ADRI), University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia.
2
School of Life Sciences, University of Technology Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia.

Abstract

Malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) is associated with asbestos exposure. Asbestos can induce chronic inflammation which in turn can lead to silencing of tumour suppressor genes. Wnt signaling pathway can be affected by chronic inflammation and is aberrantly activated in many cancers including colon and MPM. SFRP genes are antagonists of Wnt pathway, and SFRPs are potential tumour suppressors in colon, gastric, breast, ovarian, and lung cancers and mesothelioma. This study investigated the expression and DNA methylation of SFRPgenes in MPM cells lines with and without demethylation treatment. Sixty-six patient FFPE samples were analysed and have showed methylation of SFRP2 (56%) and SFRP5 (70%) in MPM. SFRP2 and SFRP5 tumour-suppressive activity in eleven MPM lines was confirmed, and long-term asbestos exposure led to reduced expression of the SFRP1 and SFRP2 genes in the mesothelium (MeT-5A) via epigenetic alterations. Finally, DNA methylation of SFRPs is detectable in MPM patient plasma samples, with methylated SFRP2 and SFRP5showing a tendency towards greater abundance in patients. These data suggested that SFRP genes have tumour-suppresive activity in MPM and that methylated DNA from SFRP gene promoters has the potential to serve as a biomarker for MPM patient plasma.

Staggering: "Around 20 per cent of the population is thought to have NAFLD, while five per cent have developed advanced stages of the condition."

'It's a ticking timebomb': NHS set for liver disease crisis

LIVER disease caused by obesity and poor lifestyle is a “ticking timebomb” for the NHS, experts say. Around three million Britons are believed to have dangerous levels of fat building up around their livers which could lead to organ breakdown and the need for transplants.


"Around 20 per cent of the population is thought to have NAFLD, while five per cent have developed advanced stages of the condition."

Breast Imaging of Transgender Individuals

 2018;6(1):1. doi: 10.1007/s40134-018-0260-1. Epub 2018 Jan 18.

Breast Imaging of Transgender Individuals: A Review.

Author information

1
1Department of Radiology, Icahn School of Medicine at Mt Sinai, One Gustav Levy Place, New York, NY 10029 USA.
2
2Department of Medicine, Center for Transgender Medicine and Surgery at Mt. Sinai , 275 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10011 USA.
3
3Department of Medicine, Icahn School of Medicine at Mt. Sinai, 275 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10011 USA.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

This review will inform radiologists about the evidence base regarding radiographic imaging for transgender individuals and considerations for providing culturally sensitive care for this population.

FINDINGS:

Transgender individuals are increasingly referred for both screening and diagnostic breast imaging. It is important that the clinic environment is welcoming, the medical staff utilize accepted terminology and patients are able to designate their gender and personal history to ensure appropriate care. Hormone and surgical treatments used for transition by many transgender women and men may change the approach to imaging.

SUMMARY:

Although not yet evidence-based, screening mammography is currently suggested for transgender women with risk factors, including those receiving hormone treatment over 5 years. The risk for breast cancer in transgender individuals is still being defined.

"the bus for the 1970's leaves in 30 minutes. Please have your boarding passes ready."

"the bus for the 1970's leaves in 30 minutes. Please have your boarding passes ready."

Sunday, January 28, 2018

"Among the world’s 20 most populous countries, the highest proportional rates of adult obesity can be found in the United States (36%), Turkey and Egypt (32% each), Mexico (29%) and Iran (26%)."

US Obesity in Global Perspective

What is the U.S. share of the global problem compared to overall population share?
"Among the world’s 20 most populous countries, the highest proportional rates of adult obesity can be found in the United States (36%), Turkey and Egypt (32% each), Mexico (29%) and Iran (26%)."


Artificial Intelligence, Physiological Genomics, and Precision Medicine

 2018 Jan 26. doi: 10.1152/physiolgenomics.00119.2017. [Epub ahead of print]

Artificial Intelligence, Physiological Genomics, and Precision Medicine.

Author information

1
Physiology and Center of Systems Molecular Medicine, Medical College of Wisconsin, United States.
2
Medical College of Wisconsin.
3
Medicine, Medical College of Wisconsin.
4
Bioethics and Medical Humanities, Medical College of Wisconsin.
5
Physiology and Cancer Center, Medical College of Wisconsin, United States.

Abstract

Big data is a major driver in the development of precision medicine. Efficient analysis methods are needed to transform big data into clinically-actionable knowledge. To accomplish this, many researchers are turning towards machine learning (ML), an approach of artificial intelligence (AI) that utilizes modern algorithms to give computers the ability to learn. Much of the effort to advance ML for precision medicine has been focused on the development and implementation of algorithms and the generation of ever larger quantities of genomic sequence data and electronic health records. However, relevance and accuracy of the data are as important as quantity of data in the advancement of ML for precision medicine. For common diseases, physiological genomic readouts in disease-applicable tissues may be an effective surrogate to measure the effect of genetic and environmental factors and their interactions that underlie disease development and progression. Disease-applicable tissue may be difficult to obtain, but there are important exceptions such as kidney needle biopsy specimens. As AI continues to advance, new analytical approaches, including those that go beyond data correlation, need to be developed and ethical issues of AI need to be addressed. Physiological genomic readouts in disease-relevant tissues, combined with advanced AI, can be a powerful approach for precision medicine for common diseases.

Saturday, January 27, 2018

Chicago - Call On Me

Chicago - Call On Me 

Study links poor sleep to childhood obesity



Study links poor sleep to childhood obesity


"Today, many children are not getting enough sleep," he said in a news release from the American Association for Cancer Research. "There are a number of distractions, such as screens in the bedroom, that contribute to interrupted, fragmented sleep.
"This, perpetuated over time, can be a risk factor for obesity," he added. "Because of the strong links between obesity and many types of cancer, childhood obesity prevention is cancer prevention, in my view."

Saturday Night Economics

ROUND ONE


ROUND TWO

"What is the emptiness of the midlife crisis if not the unqualified emptiness in which one sees no value in anything? What was wrong with my life?"

How Schopenhauer’s thought can illuminate a midlife crisis


"I am not alone. Perhaps you have felt, too, an emptiness in the pursuit of worthy goals. This is one form of midlife crisis, at once familiar and philosophically puzzling. The paradox is that success can seem like failure. Like any paradox, it calls for philosophical treatment. What is the emptiness of the midlife crisis if not the unqualified emptiness in which one sees no value in anything? What was wrong with my life?
In search of an answer, I turned to the 19th-century pessimist Arthur Schopenhauer. Schopenhauer is notorious for preaching the futility of desire. That getting what you want could fail to make you happy would not have surprised him at all. On the other hand, not having it is just as bad. For Schopenhauer, you are damned if you do and damned if you don’t. If you get what you want, your pursuit is over. You are aimless, flooded with a ‘fearful emptiness and boredom’, as he put it in The World as Will and Representation(1818). Life needs direction: desires, projects, goals that are so far unachieved. And yet this, too, is fatal. Because wanting what you do not have is suffering. In staving off the void by finding things to do, you have condemned yourself to misery."

5 late-night activities that you can do instead of mid-night snacking

5 late-night activities that you can do instead of mid-night snacking


5. Read a book
One of the most popular ways to end the day is by reading a good book. Distract yourself and try to absorb new ideas by keeping yourself busy with a good script.

Weight loss improves pain throughout the body

Weight loss improves pain throughout the body



"Andrew Schrepf is a research investigator at Michigan Medicine's Chronic Pain and Fatigue Research Center. "Where they lost the pain was not confined just to those joints that tend to hurt when a person is really obese, like the hips and the lower back and the knees, but it was actually all over their body that they showed improvement," says Shrepf.
The findings suggest that obesity may affect pain, depression, and fatigue through a link to the central nervous system. His team is planning followup studies to learn about that mechanism."

Analysis of Fusion Genes by NanoString System: A Role in Lung Cytology?

Greta AlìMDRossella BrunoPhDMauro SavinoPhDRiccardo GianniniPhDSerena PelliccioniMLTMaura MenghiPhDLaura BoldriniPhDAgnese ProiettiMDAntonio ChellaMDAlessandro RibechiniMDGabriella FontaniniMD
From the Unit of Pathological Anatomy (Drs Alì and Proietti and Ms Pelliccioni) and Pneumology (Dr Chella), the Endoscopic Section of Pneumology (Dr Ribechini), and the Program of Pleuropulmonary Pathology (Dr Fontanini), Azienda Ospedaliero Universitaria Pisana, Pisa, Italy; the Department of Surgical, Medical, Molecular Pathology and Critical Area, University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy (Drs Bruno, Giannini, and Boldrini); and Diatech Pharmacogenetics srl, Jesi, Italy (Drs Savino and Menghi).
Reprints: Professor Gabriella Fontanini, MD, Program of Pleuropulmonary Pathology, Azienda Ospedaliero Universitaria Pisana, Via Roma 57, 56126 Pisa, Italy (email: ).
Context.— Patients with non–small cell lung cancer harboring ALK receptor tyrosine kinase (ALK), ROS proto-oncogene 1 (ROS1), and ret proto-oncogene (RET) gene rearrangements can benefit from specific kinase inhibitors. Detection of fusion genes is critical for determining the best treatment. Assessing rearrangements in non–small cell lung cancer remains challenging, particularly for lung cytology.
Objective.— To examine the possible application of the multiplex, transcript-based NanoString system (NanoString Technologies, Seattle, Washington) in the evaluation of fusion genes in lung adenocarcinoma samples.
Data sources.— This study is a narrative literature review. Studies about NanoString, gene fusions, and lung adenocarcinoma were collected from PubMed (National Center for Biotechnology Information, Bethesda, Maryland). We found 7 articles about the application of the NanoString system to detect fusion genes on formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tumor tissues and one article evaluating the adequacy of lung cytologic specimens for NanoString gene expression analysis.
Conclusions.— To maximize the yield of molecular tests on small lung biopsies, the NanoString nCounter system has been suggested to detect fusion genes. NanoString fusion gene assays have been successfully applied on formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissues. Although there are only few studies available, the application of NanoString assays may also be feasible in lung cytology. According to available data, the NanoString system could strengthen the routine molecular characterization of lung adenocarcinoma.

Friday, January 26, 2018

Taxing the World Out of Obesity

Taxing the World Out of Obesity

Taxes on sugary beverages have become a popular approach for countries looking to reduce overweight and obesity. But it is a problem that will require more than one solution.
"Experts are quick to caution, though, that taxes on sugary beverages alone are not a panacea. So even as they applaud the rising price of soda, they are also pushing for a suite of interventions that include warnings on labels, restricted marketing to children and replacing those unhealthy options – including sugary drinks – with more nutritious alternatives."

Get ready, some medical experts are predicting the worst flu season in history. But in 1918...

Get ready, some medical experts are predicting the worst flu season in history

  • Medical experts are bracing for one of the worst flu seasons in history.
  • The main flu strain for 2017-18 is known as the H3N2 virus, and it is more deadly than the swine flu.
  • The flu is now widespread in about 46 states, reports the CDC.
  • The National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases and other organizations are calling for the development of a universal vaccine.


c.f., https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1918_flu_pandemic

Thursday, January 25, 2018

"Parents and children are more likely to have overweight or obesity if they live in a county with a higher rate of obesity..."

Obesity may involve ‘social contagion’ component

Parents and children are more likely to have overweight or obesity if they live in a county with a higher rate of obesity, according to findings published in JAMA Pediatrics.
“Disentangling the extent to which the clustering of obesity within networks is due to social contagion vs. the competing explanations of self-selection (ie, homophily and residential selection) and shared environment is crucial because of their different implications for public health policy-making,” Ashlesha Datar, PhD, of the Center for Economic and Social Research at the University of Southern California, and Nancy Nicosia, PhD, of the RAND Corporation in Boston, wrote in the study background. “A contagion effect would favor policies that target social networks, such as directing interventions toward well-connected individuals within networks to leverage their potential multiplier effect or interventions that seek to change norms and attitudes. A shared environment effect would favor interventions that target aspects of the built or policy environment. However, self-selection would suggest a more limited role for interventions focusing on social networks or built environments.”



On the Relationship between Medical Ethics and the Law

 2018 Jan 17. doi: 10.1093/medlaw/fwx064. [Epub ahead of print]

On the Relationship between Medical Ethics and the Law.

Author information

1
CSEP/School of Law, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL, iain.brassington@manchester.ac.uk.

Abstract

In his comments on Bland, Lord Justice Hoffmann stated that 'I would expect medical ethics to be formed by the law rather than the reverse'. But what judges expect, and what they have a right to expect, are different things; I shall use Hoffmann LJ's statement as a way into looking at the relationship between ethics and law, and argue that it is partially correct insofar as that it makes a prediction about that relationship. Professional ethics and codes of ethics are shaped by law; but law is shaped by those codes to some extent, and both are influenced by 'philosophical ethics'. As a normative claim, Hoffmann LJ's statement is more compelling; but he also distinguished between 'medical ethics' and 'morality', and this merits exploration. There remains a question about the proper relationship between law, ethics, and morality that I shall address.

Opera? Opera's boring

Opera?  Opera's boring

Go West - What You Won't Do For Love. Best version, IMHO

Go West - What You Won't Do For Love

Does Volk v DeMeerleer Conflict with the AMA Code of Medical Ethics on Breaching Patient Confidentiality to Protect Third Parties?

 2018 Jan 1;20(1):10-18. doi: 10.1001/journalofethics.2018.20.1.peer2-1801.

Does Volk v DeMeerleer Conflict with the AMA Code of Medical Ethics on Breaching Patient Confidentiality to Protect Third Parties?

Author information

1
An assistant professor and an associate residency director in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at the University of Washington in Seattle, and a staff psychiatrist at the VA Puget Sound Health Care System.
2
A psychiatrist at Valley Medical Center in Renton, Washington.

Abstract

A recent Washington State case revisits the obligation of mental health clinicians to protect third parties from the violent acts of their patients. Although the case of Volk v DeMeerleer raises multiple legal, ethical, and policy issues, this article will focus on a potential ethical conflict between the case law and professional guidelines, namely the American Medical Association's Code of Medical Ethics.

Never gets old: King Harvest's Dancing in the Moonlight

Dancing in the Moonlight

Updated Molecular Testing Guideline for the Selection of Lung Cancer Patients for Treatment With Targeted Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors: Guideline From the College of American Pathologists, the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer, and the Association for Molecular Pathology

Neal I. LindemanMDPhilip T. CagleMDDara L. AisnerMD, PhDMaria E. ArcilaMDMary Beth BeasleyMDEric BernickerMD;Carol ColasaccoMLIS, SCT(ASCP)Sanja DacicMD, PhDFred R. HirschMD, PhDKeith KerrMB, ChBDavid J. KwiatkowskiMD, PhDMarc LadanyiMDJan A. NowakMD, PhDLynette ShollMDRobyn Temple-SmolkinPhDBenjamin SolomonMBBS, PhDLesley H. SouterPhDErik ThunnissenMD, PhDMing S. TsaoMDChristina B. VenturaMPH, MT(ASCP)Murry W. WynesPhDYasushi YatabeMD, PhD
From the Departments of Pathology (Drs Lindeman and Sholl) and Medicine (Dr Kwiatkowski), Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts; the Department of Pathology and Genomic Medicine, Houston Methodist Hospital, Houston, Texas (Dr Cagle); the Department of Pathology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Denver (Dr Aisner); the Diagnostic and Molecular Pathology Laboratory (Dr Arcila) and the Molecular Diagnostics Service (Dr Ladanyi), Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York; the Department of Pathology & Medicine, Pulmonary, Critical Care and Sleep Medicine, New York, New York (Dr Beasley); the Cancer Research Program, Houston Methodist Research Institute, Houston, Texas (Dr Bernicker); the Pathology and Laboratory Quality Center, College of American Pathologists, Northfield, Illinois (Mss Colasacco and Ventura); the Department of Pathology, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (Dr Dacic); the Department of Medicine and Pathology, University of Colorado, Denver (Dr Hirsch); the Department of Pathology, University of Aberdeen, Aberdeen, Scotland (Dr Kerr); the Department of Molecular Pathology, Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, New York (Dr Nowak); the Clinical and Scientific Affairs Division, Association for Molecular Pathology, Bethesda, Maryland (Dr Temple-Smolkin); the Molecular Therapeutics and Biomarkers Laboratory, Peter Maccallum Cancer Center, Melbourne, Australia (Dr Solomon); the Department of Pathology, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, the Netherlands (Dr Thunnissen); the Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathobiology, Princess Margaret Cancer Center, Toronto, Ontario, Canada (Dr Tsao); Scientific Affairs, International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer, Aurora, Colorado (Dr Wynes); and the Department of Pathology and Molecular Diagnostics, Aichi Cancer Center, Nagoya, Japan (Dr Yatabe). Dr Souter is in private practice in Wellanport, Ontario, Canada.
Reprints: Neal I. Lindeman, MD, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Department of Pathology, 75 Francis St, Shapiro 5, Room 020, Boston, MA 02115 (email: ).
Supplemental digital content is available for this article. See text for hyperlink.
Authors' disclosures of potential conflicts of interest and author contributions are found in the Appendix at the end of this article.
This guideline was developed through collaboration among the College of American Pathologists, the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer, the Association for Molecular Pathology, and the American Society for Investigative Pathology and has been jointly published by invitation and consent in the Archives of Pathology & Laboratory MedicineJournal of Thoracic Oncology, and The Journal of Molecular Diagnostics. Copyright 2018 College of American Pathologists, International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer, Association for Molecular Pathology, and American Society for Investigative Pathology.
Context.— In 2013, an evidence-based guideline was published by the College of American Pathologists, the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer, and the Association for Molecular Pathology to set standards for the molecular analysis of lung cancers to guide treatment decisions with targeted inhibitors. New evidence has prompted an evaluation of additional laboratory technologies, targetable genes, patient populations, and tumor types for testing.
Objective.— To systematically review and update the 2013 guideline to affirm its validity; to assess the evidence of new genetic discoveries, technologies, and therapies; and to issue an evidence-based update.
Design.— The College of American Pathologists, the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer, and the Association for Molecular Pathology convened an expert panel to develop an evidence-based guideline to help define the key questions and literature search terms, review abstracts and full articles, and draft recommendations.
Results.— Eighteen new recommendations were drafted. The panel also updated 3 recommendations from the 2013 guideline.
Conclusions.— The 2013 guideline was largely reaffirmed with updated recommendations to allow testing of cytology samples, require improved assay sensitivity, and recommend against the use of immunohistochemistry for EGFR testing. Key new recommendations include ROS1 testing for all adenocarcinoma patients; the inclusion of additional genes (ERBB2, MET, BRAF, KRAS, and RET) for laboratories that perform next-generation sequencing panels; immunohistochemistry as an alternative to fluorescence in situ hybridization for ALK and/or ROS1 testing; use of 5% sensitivity assays for EGFR T790M mutations in patients with secondary resistance to EGFR inhibitors; and the use of cell-free DNA to “rule in” targetable mutations when tissue is limited or hard to obtain.

Monday, January 15, 2018

"...Mississippians can enjoy the Mississippi Civil Rights Museum and the Museum of Mississippi History on Monday, Jan. 15, and Tuesday, Jan. 16, free of charge." #MLK

Free Admission to 2 Museums in Honor of MLK Day Through Tuesday


 — In honor of Martin Luther King Jr. Day and the second annual National Day of Racial Healing, Mississippians can enjoy the Mississippi Civil Rights Museum and the Museum of Mississippi History on Monday, Jan. 15, and Tuesday, Jan. 16, free of charge.
The two museums are open today and Tuesday from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.

"The researchers believe caffeine alone may not be responsible for energy drinks' negative health effects."

More than half of young people suffer devastating side effects from energy drinks, including vomiting, chest pains and even SEIZURES, study finds


  • Some 24.7% experience fast heart rates and 24.1% suffer insomnia
  • Headaches affect 18.3%, while 5.1% suffer from diarrhoea and nausea 
  • Researchers believe consuming the drinks with alcohol makes them worse
  • Energy drinks can contain 160mg of caffeine; 105mg is the safe daily limit
  • Sales in the UK increased by 185% between 2006 and 2015



"The researchers believe caffeine alone may not be responsible for energy drinks' negative health effects. 

Lead author Professor David Hammond said: 'Most risk assessments to date have used coffee as a reference for estimating the health effects of energy drinks, however, it is clear these products pose a greater health risk. 

'The health effects from energy [drinks] could be due to different ingredients than coffee, or the ways in which they are consumed, including with alcohol or during physical activity.'"










Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/article-5270827/Young-people-experience-effects-energy-drinks.html#ixzz54GM2CxHz
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Sunday, January 14, 2018

The Observer view on the government’s environment and obesity plans

The Observer view on the government’s environment and obesity plans




"There are echoes of the same toothless voluntarism the government has adopted in its obesity strategy. Consumer palates have been conditioned over time by food producers to want cheap – and addictive – fat, sugar and salt. This undermines the argument that healthy eating should be a matter of consumer choice. Because there is a strong first-mover taste disadvantage to reducing levels of fat, sugar and salt, the only answer lies in the compulsory product reformulation that has proved so effective in improving population nutrition around the world. Yet the government insists on leaving it up to food producers, a recipe for inaction."

"Citing data that British people are taking in 200 to 300 excess calories a day, the country’s health body is set to impose new rules..."

Britain to go on countrywide diet as officials plan to introduce calorie caps



"Citing data that British people are taking in 200 to 300 excess calories a day, the country’s health body is set to impose new rules on fast food outlets and ready meals at supermarkets. The guidelines are meant to restrict lunches and dinners to 600 calories and reduce breakfast portions to 400 calories.
 The body decided to put Britons on a nationwide diet with a view to tackle rising obesity rates. Their chief nutritionist said that retailers selling high calorie food as treats encouraged over-consumption as she said a series of calorie caps will be introduced on items like Pizzas and ready-to-eat sandwiches.
The guidelines recommend 1600 calories per day for people including two 100 calorie snacks for a healthy life. A recent study pointed out that 63 percent adults in England are too heavy, classified 36 percent as overweight and found that 27 percent had registered as obese."